Lesotho

I admit it… I don’t function well in the third world!  We are having ongoing issues with internet access, which means it is difficult to email, blog, and skype.  As a result I have been unable to post the great things we are seeing and doing.  Since I am getting a signal right now, here we go…

If you look at a map of South Africa you will see a small “island” within the country… This is the country of Lesotho.  We went with the Passaros and another American missionary named Jeremiah to Lesotho two weekends ago.  What an awesome experience!  Only 4×4 vehicles are able to negotiate the treacherous roads up Sani Pass…

lesotho-view-with-road

lesotho-trecherous-road

Here we are halfway up to the top…

lesotho-group-photo1

lesotho-bri-and-rachel1

lesotho-family-pic

lesotho-the-girls

There are three “Grades” of road into Lesotho.  Initially the driver took us over Grade 1 roads – typical gravel roads.  Then as we approached Lesotho the roads had deep potholes and fairly large rocks, probably the worst roads I have ever been on – Grade 2.  Then in Lesotho Grade 3 roads – Yikes!  Rachel and I were in the back laughing hysterically because we could not carry on a conversation due to the rocking of the vehicle as the driver took us over huge rocks, through streams, and around hairpin turns.   Fortunately the Passaro’s had been to Lesotho before and suggested we bring Ruthie’s car seat for this trip.

lesotho-girls-on-bus

Annie, Charlie and Peter with the girls

Annie, Charlie and Peter with the girls

lesotho-good-view

One of the many waterfalls we saw

One of the many waterfalls we saw

This did not look like the Border Posts in the United States!

lesotho-better-border-pic

Unfortunately Lesotho is a very poor country.  Many of the people there are shepherds, but it takes days to get the sheep to market in South Africa.  Supplies must come from South Africa as well, so “taxis” negotiate the dangerous roads occasionally.  At an elevation of over 9,000 feet the winters are harsh; it was already getting chilly at the top when we were there.  Can you imagine living in these primitive huts anytime, but especially in snow?

lesoto-hut

lesotho-village

lesoto-huts

People hang out different color flags to show what supplies they have in their huts to sell.  Here is a white flag to signify that they have brewed their own beer to sell.

lesoto-village-with-flag1

In one area of the village people were hoping to attract some tourists by entertaining us.  Look carefully to see their homemade instruments…

lesotho-music-group

These men are draped in the traditional Lesotho blankets that we saw most people wearing. Unfortunately we could not find any to purchase.

One family invited us inside their hut to show us their homemade crafts and to offer us homemade bread and beer.  The beer has a very low alcohol content so rather than be rude, EVERYONE tasted it out of the same cup…

Rachel's first (and possibly last!) beer.  None of us cared for it!

Rachel's first (and possibly last!) beer. None of us cared for it!

The hut we visited... The little girl captured our hearts instantly

The hut we visited... The little girl captured our hearts instantly

lesotho-little-girl

Some shepherds on the long journey to South Africa to sell sheep to Zulus for their sacrifices to the ancestors

Some shepherds on the long journey to South Africa to sell sheep to Zulus for their sacrifices to the ancestors

Unlike South Africa where we see extremes of “haves” and “have-nots,” in Lesotho we saw only poverty.  But it was  in the midst of the most amazing scenery we have ever seen.

lesotho-views

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3 Responses to “Lesotho”


  1. 1 Lisa March 27, 2009 at 2:29 am

    Wow! What amazing scenery…and experiences! Lesotho is beautiful. Were you able to communicate with the villagers you met? Also, I’m so glad to hear your housing situation has worked out. God certainly does provide!

    We miss you guys….

    Lisa

  2. 2 Kristin Augustine March 27, 2009 at 8:00 am

    Good question – our driver spoke the Lesotho language so he translated for us… Miss you too!


  1. 1 Catch Up Time? « In To Africa Trackback on April 2, 2009 at 10:22 pm

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